Archaeology

The study of the past by excavation and analysis of its material remains. – Wiktionary.

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    TARG activities are re-starting and notices will be sent to members. Unfortunately, there will be no Springfield Barn Dig in 2021 but we have plans for sorting finds and pot drawing sessions, including from the 2010 dig.

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    After 11 years of archaeological and historical research on the Ticknall Potteries, we have run out of sites for further investigation. We always knew this would be the case as we were initially only funded for three years, but we have managed to keep going for a lot longer thanks to all the people who […]

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    We all know about having a special mug with a design that really means something to its owner. A football club’s logo is perhaps the commonest example these days, so you can show the world who you support. Football clubs inspire intense, often lifelong, loyalty through good times and bad. They generate a sense of […]

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    We met for coffee at the Bull’s Head, where, with the aid of a map, Janet gave us a brief history of Repton from Anglo Saxons, Vikings and their eventual settlement in 874, the changing course of the river, its mills, ferries and fords and the development of the village. This was followed by a […]

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    Following the 2016 and 2018 excavations, the primary purpose of the 2019 excavation was to reopen the principal 2018 dig site and its adjacent area in order to prove (or otherwise) the existence of one or more kilns. Last year’s dig found materials and finds consistent with a close proximity to a kiln structure. This […]

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    Another First for Ticknall! In 2014 Ticknall Archaeological Research Group uncovered the first and so far only production site for Ticknall Bottles. This pottery form has previously always been referred to as Martincamp Flasks and thought to be imported from Normandy. Although this is the familiar shape known as the Martincamp Flask, an unusual Midlands […]

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    We started in 2010 with a ‘Your Heritage’ grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund over 3 years, to investigate the archaeology of Ticknall’s potteries and its landscape history. After ten years, the Ticknall Archaeological Research Group is still going strong and we have extended the range of activities. We still do digs on pottery sites, […]

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    There are over 30 known pottery sites in the Ticknall area. Excavations have produced 13th century Coal Measures White Wares on production sites. Documents from 1328 refer to “le cleyputs” and in the late 1200s “Henricus ad Furnum” (Henry at the oven) is named. It is probably a pot oven. By 1538-1547 seven potters were […]

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    A large field, recently ploughed, 20 volunteers, eager to be trained, and a fine sunny day, what more could anyone want? This was

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    We need drawings of some of our finds to include in reports on our projects. The reports are published as TARG reports, where the archaeology and the interpretation is all done by TARG members.  The reports go to the official archaeological record and to the National Trust. Pot drawing (most of the finds being pottery) sessions usually take […]

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    Well! That was the year that wasn’t! Little did we suspect, when we met for TARG’s AGM in March last year, the magnitude of what was about to hit us a few days later. 2020 was TARG’s 10th anniversary and we were looking forward to yet another year of busy activity. Unfortunately, due to the […]

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    Ticknall Archaeological Research Group is always pleased to welcome new members. Annual Subscription (for the calendar year, including insurance) is £10, £5 for under 16s. To join TARG please email targ.sec@gmail.com for further information. TARG Facebook

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    Avoncroft Museum is home to over 30 different buildings and structures which have been rescued and re-built in rural Worcestershire. The Museum is spread over 19 acres of beautiful Worcestershire countryside and includes a wildflower meadow, period gardens, a traditional cider and perry orchard, as well as the collection of historic buildings. We had a […]

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    On a fine, sunny Saturday morning, a number of TARG members gathered at Tadsor, off Coal Lane, for a field walking session. It didn’t take long to set up 8 lanes, each with 4 stints. The ground was so hard we could hardly get the poles and canes in – we really do need some […]

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    On the 5th August 2017, a group of TARG members was given a guided tour of Sinai House by the owner Kate Newton. The house, located at Shobnall on the outskirts of Burton, is a Grade II* listed building. It has a long and interesting history, but was derelict when the current owners acquired it […]

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    In July 2017 Ticknall Archaeological Research Group had a very interesting and informative day school, led by Janet Spavold and Sue Brown, on reading the history of vernacular houses. In the first session of the morning Janet gave us a whistle-stop tour of how the style of houses changed from the Medieval period to the […]

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    Before our house was built some forty years ago there was, according to local history, evidence of a pottery on the site. Nobody can be sure of exact dates but pottery finds in the garden of our neighbour have been dated to around the fifteenth to sixteenth century. Many people in the village already know […]

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