History of Ticknall

Ticknall’s name was derived from its landscape setting and land use. The first syllable ‘tic’ reflects the pastoral economy of the time, showing that it was grazed by goats. There were still goatherds in the area in the 16th century. The second syllable is ‘halh’ (Saxon) = a nook or hollow of land, the village being tucked into a slight dip in the landscape.

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John Oliver Remembers

The Cruiser HMS Neptune sank with the loss of 764 officers and men on the night of 19 December 1941. Just one man was rescued by an Italian torpedo boat, after 5 days in the water. Among those missing presumed dead was John Olivers brother, 20 year old Thomas Oliver. The boat went down as John was preparing to celebrate his birthday  on 20 December.

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Local Plan Part 2 consultation

A consultation that will move a key future planning document a step closer to adoption has been launched. South Derbyshire District Council submitted its Local Plan Part 2 to the Government’s Planning Inspectorate for consideration back in January, with the inspector responsible now allowing the next phase of the process to proceed.

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